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Erin White

Erin White
Zoologist
New York Natural Heritage Program
625 Broadway, 5th Floor
Albany, NY 12233-4757
phone (518) 402-8955

Projects

Vulnerability of at-risk species to climate change in New York

Citation: Schlesinger, M.D., J.D. Corser, K.A. Perkins, and E.L. White. 2011. Vulnerability of at-risk species to climate change in New York. New York Natural Heritage Program, Albany, NY.

Vulnerability assessments are rapidly becoming an essential tool in climate change adaptation planning. As states revise their Wildlife Action Plans, the need to integrate climate change considerations drives the adoption of vulnerability assessments as critical components. To help meet this need for New York, we calculated the relative vulnerability of 119 of New York’s Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) using NatureServe’s Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI). Funding was provided to the New York Natural Heritage Program by New York State Wildlife Grants in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Division of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration.

For more information, presentations, documents, and other downloads, please go here.

New York State Freshwater Conservation Blueprint Project, Phases I and II: Freshwater Systems, Species, and Viability Metrics

Citation: White, E.L., J.J. Schmid, T.G. Howard, M.D. Schlesinger, and A.L. Feldmann. 2011. New York State freshwater conservation blueprint project, phases I and II: Freshwater systems, species, and viability metrics. New York Natural Heritage Program, The Nature Conservancy. Albany, NY. 85 pp. plus appendix.

The project goal was to develop GIS datasets that identify the locations and status of critical freshwater targets (habitats and species) in New York. The focus of the effort was rivers, streams, and lakes, and specific targets included freshwater and migratory fish, mussels, and other aquatic Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCNs) which may serve as indicators of river and stream health.

For more information about this project please go here.

Distribution and Status of the Odonates of New York

Citation: White, E.L., J.D. Corser, M.D. Schlesinger. 2010. Distribution and Status of the Odonates of New York. New York Natural Heritage Program, Albany, New York.

The New York Dragonfly and Damselfly Survey (NYDDS) began in 2005, spanned five field seasons through 2009, and relied heavily on citizen scientists to help collect data over a large geographic area. Its primary goal was to document the current distribution of all odonate species in New York State. Survey efforts were directed toward under-surveyed regions, areas with potential high diversity, and locations with potential for harboring Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN).

Our five-year sampling effort yielded many important finds. Most notable were five species added to the list of known odonates for the state, bringing the cumulative total to 194 species, one of the highest diversities of any U.S. state. Participants visited over 2,170 survey sites statewide and a total of 4,383 surveys were conducted, including repeat visits. We confirmed over 18,000 individual species records based on our verification protocol. NYDDS yielded 1,111 new county records beyond these preexisting data. Each county’s documented richness increased by 18 species on average, and we documented at least 75 species in two-thirds of New Yorks’ 62 counties. A list was compiled for each county as well as a distributional map and phenology chart for all 194 species and full species accounts are included for all 48 SGCN.

For more information, presentations, documents, and other downloads, please go here.